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Want more conversions? Frame your Content.

Each piece of your website that contains text and images must speak to your ideal customer. The seemingly endless array of websites and apps are threatening to lure your viewers to another task, so you need to make an impression quickly.

Once you do have their attention, keeping it, and getting them to take action (make a purchase, sign up for an email or follow you on social media), require that you understand the customer enough that you can convince them to move.

The way to increase your chances is to frame your content. In other words, show your clients you understand their need and what it will look like after you’ve solved their problem. 

Here’s an example: (Please note I just Googled a bunch of industries and snagged websites that worked as good examples, I have NO affiliation with any of the examples, and I'm not endorsing any of their services).  

Beachbody is a health and fitness company. They sell fitness programs and nutritional supplements.  When you log onto their page, the first thing you see is this: 



Can you tell they KNOW who their customer is? Their ideal customer is the person who wants to lose weight but for one reason or another doesn’t want to or can’t access a gym. 

Here’s another example. Avant is selling customers on a personal loan. How are they doing it? They identify the problem and offer a picture of what success looks like (financial control). The happy family in front of a lovely house helps too.  



If you browse through both pages, you’ll find content that speaks to their ideal customer, in a language their customer understands and about topics that address customer stressors.  

Know your Customer

If your business is well established, you might already have an idea of what your ideal customer looks like. If you are just starting out, now is the time to firm up your target audience.

When creating website (or any marketing) content, you’ll save a lot of time and energy is you can answer these questions about your perfect customer:

What do they like?
What is important to them?
What problem(s) do they need help to solve?

While there are other things you should know about your customer (income bracket- for example), the three questions above provide a perfect place to begin formulating content ideas. 

Talk to your customer


If you are a real estate agent targeting low-income families, you’ll use different language and talk about different topics than if you are selling to customers purchasing million-dollar homes. Failing to tailor your writing style can alienate potential clients. Matching your tone to your target audience builds trust. 

This applies to ALL areas of content (including social media posts). 

Paint a picture

Show your customers what they get. One of the key components of framing content is showing readers/customers/potential clients what their life will look like if the work with you. 

Have you ever seen a commercial for Disneyland or Walt Disney World? The company is, quite literally, selling "magic, " and people are buying it!  Customers pay for hotels and park tickets and souvenirs, but Disney gets consumers to do that by selling them magical memories and experiences with their families. Their marketing is full of words like “dreams come true,” “celebrate,” and “memories,” and it works because people want to see what the result of their decision will look like. 

Give them something good

Consumers have trust issues. This mistrust is especially potent if you are in the real estate or financial business (both of which consistently rank among the least trusted industries by consumers). One way to combat that lack of confidence is to give them something free in the form of content. That can look like blog posts or an e-book. Your goal is to set yourself up as an expert your customers can trust. Do that by helping them out. (For example, a real estate agent might offer an e-book about improving your credit score, the loan process, or warning signs to look for when buying a house).

Whether you market online or via more traditional methods, framing your content is the best way to attract your ideal customers and to keep them around. 

Need help with a writing project? Check out my writer website at www.angelajbrown.com

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